The Russian experience in the treatment of radiation sickness can be used to help victims in the accident at the Fukushima-1.

Russia has accumulated extensive experience in using the latest advances in stem cell transplantation for the treatment of radiation sickness in severe and an extremely severe degree, which can be used to treat victims in the elimination of the accident at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima-1, the first deputy director general of the Federal Medical and Biological Center named after A.I. Burnazyan / BMBTS / FMBA of Russia Andrey Bushmanov.

According to him, Russian specialists today have the experience of liquidating the consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, which was recognized as the largest technogenic catastrophe of the 20th century. "From this point of view, Russia is the most ready country with the knowledge and practical experience for liquidation consequences of possible accidents, including those with radionuclide releases and pollution of territories, "Bushmanov stressed. FMBA especially notes the great experience of Russian doctors in providing assistance to participants in radiation accidents, including the treatment of acute radiation injuries with the help of stem cells.

So after the Chernobyl accident, twelve seriously affected, who developed acute radiation sickness severe and extremely severe (emergency workers of nuclear power plants), bone marrow transplantation the brain. "All of them who survived had a recovery of their own / not transplanted from the donor / bone marrow stated the chief occupational pathologist of the Ministry of Health and Social Development of the Russian Federation. The experience of Chernobyl, according to Bushmanov, showed that stem cell transplantation is likely to be necessary for the victims irradiated in doses from 10 to 12 Gy, in the event that the victims do not have a lesion of others bodies.

"This problem becomes extremely urgent when events such as Fukushima occur notes Alexander Prikhodko, director of the stem cell bank Gemabank. - The experience that Russia has accumulated in the liquidation of the consequences of Chernobyl can not be overestimated. Therefore, the use of stem cells in the treatment of radiation sickness was included in the discussion with the European Group for Bone Marrow Transplantation at our Symposium to be held April 15 ».

Andrei Bushmanov stressed that it is expedient to harvest our own human stem cells working in dangerous conditions beforehand the possibility of emergency exposure, or a person who is sent to the center of the accident, when possible irradiation in doses that cause the development of acute radiation disease. However, in the absence of this possibility, stem cells derived from umbilical cord blood can also be used, they can be delivered most quickly for transplantation.

"For such cases as Fukushima and Chernobyl, the best option for using stem cells in therapy is the transplantation of personal material the deputy head of the BMBTS im. Burnazyan Arthur Isaev, founder of the stem cell bank "Gemabank" and general director of the Institute of Human Stem Cells. - I believe that for all employees of nuclear power plants and the Ministry of Emergency Situations, who can take part in eliminating the consequences of such events as Chernobyl, Fukushima should be ensured the personal storage of bone marrow stem cells, by analogy with the umbilical cord blood ".

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